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“Prayer is the best weapon we have; it is the key to God's heart. You must speak to Jesus not only with your lips, but with your heart. In fact on certain occasions you should only speak to Him with your heart." Viva Cristo Rey! Long Live Christ the King! ... See MoreSee Less

“Prayer is the best weapon we have; it is the key to Gods heart. You must speak to Jesus not only with your lips, but with your heart. In fact on certain occasions you should only speak to Him with your heart. Viva Cristo Rey! Long Live Christ the King!

Reflection by Fr. Richard Hinkley:

While it is no longer an essential component of Funeral Masses, the medieval sequence the Dies Irae still remains the most recognizable and most influential sequence of the Church’s liturgical patrimony. The sequence is a type of hymn that originated from adding words to the melismas (many notes on the same syllable) that frequently ended the Alleluia before the Gospel. During the Middle Ages, the sequence was quite popular and many hundreds were composed for the different feasts on the liturgical calendar. Following the Council of Trent, the number of sequences was reduced in an effort to eliminate “recent” additions to the liturgy. This left the Roman Rite with the following sequences: Victimae Paschali Laudes (Easter), Veni, Sancte Spiritu (Pentecost), Lauda Sion (Corpus Christi), and Dies Irae (Masses for the Dead). In the 18th century the Stabat Mater was brought back for the Seven Sorrows of Mary (Our Lady of Sorrows) and following the Vatican II Council, the Dies Irae was removed from the funeral liturgy.

This removal from the funeral liturgy did not mean, however, that it was removed entirely from the Church’s liturgy. It is now an option as a hymn for the Office of Readings, Morning Prayer, and Evening Prayer for the 34th Week of Ordinary Time, that is, this week following the Solemnity of the Christ the King of the Universe. The reason for its removal is related to where it ended up being moved. The text of the Dies Irae is a meditation on the Second Coming of Christ, the General Resurrection, The Last Judgment, and the eternal reward or punishment of all peoples. Because of the emphasis which the hymn lays on judgment and the possibility of eternal loss, it was deemed as perhaps too distracting or discouraging for funerals, where hope in Christ’s conquest of Death and the pledge of Eternal Life are the central focus. Nonetheless, these “Last Things” are an especially appropriate object of consideration here at the end of the liturgical year, as well as the beginning of Advent 2021. I would encourage anyone to take the time and read through at least once this liturgical poem, as well as listen to the various ways certain composers have set the text to music. Perhaps the most famous Requiem setting of the Dies Irae, is of course, the one by Mozart. For a celebration like today’s, the movement Rex tremendae is particularly on point. The chorus repeats the word rex (king) before moving along a score that seeks to musically paint a scene that is both awe-some as it is comforting: the king of tremendous majesty coming to save his people. He is coming, Christ the King. Long live the King!

Fr. Richard Hinkley
... See MoreSee Less

Reflection by Fr. Richard Hinkley:

While it is no longer an essential component of Funeral Masses, the medieval sequence the Dies Irae still remains the most recognizable and most influential sequence of the Church’s liturgical patrimony.  The sequence is a type of hymn that originated from adding words to the melismas (many notes on the same syllable) that frequently ended the Alleluia before the Gospel.  During the Middle Ages, the sequence was quite popular and many hundreds were composed for the different feasts on the liturgical calendar.  Following the Council of Trent, the number of sequences was reduced in an effort to eliminate “recent” additions to the liturgy.  This left the Roman Rite with the following sequences: Victimae Paschali Laudes (Easter), Veni, Sancte Spiritu (Pentecost), Lauda Sion (Corpus Christi), and Dies Irae (Masses for the Dead).  In the 18th century the Stabat Mater was brought back for the Seven Sorrows of Mary (Our Lady of Sorrows) and following the Vatican II Council, the Dies Irae was removed from the funeral liturgy. 

This removal from the funeral liturgy did not mean, however, that it was removed entirely from the Church’s liturgy.  It is now an option as a hymn for the Office of Readings, Morning Prayer, and Evening Prayer for the 34th Week of Ordinary Time, that is, this week following the Solemnity of the Christ the King of the Universe.  The reason for its removal is related to where it ended up being moved.  The text of the Dies Irae is a meditation on the Second Coming of Christ, the General Resurrection, The Last Judgment, and the eternal reward or punishment of all peoples.  Because of the emphasis which the hymn lays on judgment and the possibility of eternal loss, it was deemed as perhaps too distracting or discouraging for funerals, where hope in Christ’s conquest of Death and the pledge of Eternal Life are the central focus.  Nonetheless, these “Last Things” are an especially appropriate object of consideration here at the end of the liturgical year, as well as the beginning of Advent 2021.  I would encourage anyone to take the time and read through at least once this liturgical poem, as well as listen to the various ways certain composers have set the text to music.  Perhaps the most famous Requiem setting of the Dies Irae, is of course, the one by Mozart.  For a celebration like today’s, the movement Rex tremendae is particularly on point.  The chorus repeats the word rex (king) before moving along a score that seeks to musically paint a scene that is both awe-some as it is comforting: the king of tremendous majesty coming to save his people.  He is coming, Christ the King.  Long live the King!

Fr. Richard Hinkley

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Wonderful. Thank you for a history lesson of our religion.

I love your knowledge of music and your insight. I hope you are feeling better.

Amen and amen

I think we sang the Dies Irae in Latin when I was in seventh or eighth grade at St. Vincent de Paul School in the early sixties. I can only remember the first line.

Welcome to St. John Vianney Catholic Church. This weekend we celebrate Christ the King!
We ask everyone who attends Mass at St. John Vianney to please follow all health and safety protocols:
- Wash our hands frequently
- Wear a face mask when in public
- Observe social distancing (6 FT between non household members)
** When receiving Holy Communion, Cardinal DiNardo asks that we receive in the hand.
Parishioners who are in "at risk" groups and those concerned about their health and safety should refrain from attending Mass and are encouraged to pray the Liturgy of Word and make a Spiritual Communion: www.flipsnack.com/sjvhouston/liturgy-of-the-word-christ-the-king-a-2020/full-view.html
Those who are sick should not attend Mass until they are recovered. Parishioners concerned about attending Sunday Masses are welcome to join us for daily Mass. Weekday Mass schedule: Monday through Friday at 9:00 a.m. and 12:10 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday at 7:00 p.m. The Church and Chapel are open daily from 7:00 a.m. until 3:00 p.m. and the Adoration Chapel is open 24/7.
There is no offertory collection or procession, parishioners are asked to make their stewardship offerings electronically, by mail or drop their offerings in the baskets at the doors of the church or bring them to the church offices during the week. to donate online, please click here www.stjohnvianney.org/give/donate/
Keep social distance, not spiritual distance!
... See MoreSee Less

Welcome to St. John Vianney Catholic Church. This weekend we celebrate Christ the King!
We ask everyone who attends Mass at St. John Vianney to please follow all health and safety protocols:
- Wash our hands frequently
- Wear a face mask when in public
- Observe social distancing (6 FT between non household members)
** When receiving Holy Communion, Cardinal DiNardo asks that we receive in the hand.
Parishioners who are in at risk groups and those concerned about their health and safety should refrain from attending Mass and are encouraged to pray the Liturgy of Word and make a Spiritual Communion: https://www.flipsnack.com/sjvhouston/liturgy-of-the-word-christ-the-king-a-2020/full-view.html
Those who are sick should not attend Mass until they are recovered.  Parishioners concerned about attending Sunday Masses are welcome to join us for daily Mass. Weekday Mass schedule: Monday through Friday at 9:00 a.m. and 12:10 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday at 7:00 p.m. The Church and Chapel are open daily from 7:00 a.m. until 3:00 p.m. and the Adoration Chapel is open 24/7.
There is no offertory collection or procession, parishioners are asked to make their stewardship offerings electronically, by mail or drop their offerings in the baskets at the doors of the church or bring them to the church offices during the week. to donate online, please click here https://www.stjohnvianney.org/give/donate/
Keep social distance, not spiritual distance!

Our annual Parish Turkey/Ham Drive was a huge success! We collected over 375 Turkeys/Hams and $2,000 in gift cards that went to West Houston Assistance Ministries. WHAM will distribute to families in need. Thank You to our parishioners who generously donated; Your kindness will brighten Thanksgiving for so many families!! A special Thanks to our Young Adult Ministry, Youth Formation and Social Ministries. ... See MoreSee Less

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Congratulations 🎉

Gloria a Dios

I saw a long line of cars at 12:30 this afternoon stretching from WHAM almost all the way to St. Cryil’s parking lot. All were waiting for food assistance. A true blessing for those in need.

Wonderful!!

Terrific

👏👏

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