Pastoral Care for Families at Home

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He is Risen! Alleluia!

Welcome back! St. John Vianney parish has resumed the regular weekend Mass schedule. Please observe the health protocols while at church and other public spaces.

 View Regular Sunday Mass Times  Health & Safety Protocols 

It is highly recommended that those who are in “at risk” groups (adults 65 and older or with underlying health issues) and those with concerns about their health and safety refrain from Mass attendance at this time. This page will continue to provide pastoral and spiritual resources for our parishioners who remain at home.

For our latest updates and communications, please visit our Coronavirus Updates Blog, and Follow Us on Facebook.


Spiritual Communion

My Jesus, I believe that You are present in the Most Holy Sacrament.
I Love you above all things and I desire to receive You into my soul.
Since I cannot at this moment receive You sacramentally,
come at least spiritually into my heart.
I embrace You as if You were already there
and unite myself wholly to You.
Never permit me to be separated from You.
Amen.


Sunday, June 28: Thirteenth Sunday of Ordinary Time

This Sunday’s readings invite us to reflect on another dimension of that life, hospitality. When the woman from Shunem extends to the prophet Elisha the generous hospitality of having a special guest room especially for him, she is rewarded with an unexpected gift of life: her sterility is healed and she conceives and bears a son. And even when that son dies an early death, she receives the surprising gift of his resuscitation.

Jesus’ mission discourse concludes with words elaborating that theme of hospitality and its rewards. Jesus assures his disciples that mission in his name will involve them in an adventure of hospitality that will bless abundantly those that receive them. As in the case of the Shunammite woman and Elisha, Jesus promises, “whoever receives a prophet because he is a prophet, receives a prophet’s reward.” An even larger context is revealed in the words “whoever receives you receives me, and whoever receives me receives the one who sent me” (Gospel).

In other words, Christian mission and hospitality are nothing less than living out a relationship with God. Life becomes larger than it seems. The Gospel vision denies none of the goodness of beer, cotton, and good medicine in this short biological life, but it asserts a broad network of relationships that exceeds the limitations of biological life and requires us to stretch the normal meanings of our human language about life and death.

Taken from the Sunday reflection by Fr. Dennis Hamm, SJ. Read complete reflection in this Sunday’s Liturgy of the Word.

Your Sunday Resources:

June 29: Solemnity of Saints Peter and Paul Apostles

We would probably go to confession to Peter sooner than to any of the other apostles. He is perhaps a more striking example of the simple fact of holiness. Jesus says to us as he said, in effect, to Peter: “It is not you who have chosen me, but I who have chosen you. Peter, it is not human wisdom that makes it possible for you to believe, but my Father’s revelation. I, not you, build my Church.” Paul’s experience of the risen Jesus on the road to Damascus was the driving force that made him one of the most zealous, dynamic, and courageous ambassadors of Christ the Church has ever had. But persecution, humiliation, and weakness became his day-by-day carrying of the cross, material for further transformation. The dying Christ was in him; the living Christ was his life.

Read complete reflection on Franciscan Media.

Other Resources:


Happy Fourth of July!

Getting Ready to Pray

“ Now the Lord is the Spirit and where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is freedom”. 2 Corinthians 3:17

Here in the United States we are celebrating our Independence as a nation won in 1776. The war to secure that independence was bloody and a sad way to begin a nation’s history. We have consistently struggled to preserve our union and our liberties and assist other parts of the world to gain or retain their identities. As we prepare to celebrate this week’s liturgy, we might pray for personal freedoms from dominating forces within our souls and our bodies. We can pray as well for the sacredness of other dependencies and relationships which assist our God-given identities. It is not easy to determine which dependencies are sacred and which ones are ill. It is not easy either to know when our in-dependencies are healthy or ill as well. We come to the Eucharist to express our healthy dependence on God’s love and receive the challenges to use freely God’s many gifts in the service of peace and justice.

July 5: Fourteenth Sunday of Ordinary Time

Everyone has a favorite Bible passage. Today’s Gospel is mine. The consoling words of Jesus are familiar: “Come to me, all you who labor and are burdened….”

I find it hard to say why I like this text so much. Perhaps it’s because I’ve felt burdened at times in my life, or have known others who labor greatly under sorrow and suffering. I’ve heard these words addressed to myself, and in turn I’ve shared them with others in homilies at Mass, particularly at funerals.

But in addition to the Lord’s encouragement that we come to him with our burdens, he invites us to “take up his yoke” and “learn from him.” His meekness and humility show us a way to bear our burdens.

I’ve often marveled at the paradox in Christ’s words: His yoke, his burden was the cross, and yet he calls it “easy and light.” How does the heavy burden of the cross and suffering and death become “easy and light”?

Somehow, that transformation must happen in the act of surrender, in the “giving over” of our own daily labors, burdens and crosses to the Lord. Admitting to ourselves that we cannot carry them on our own, allowing Jesus to shoulder them with us; letting go of control—in that simple, childlike surrender, we discover the rest Jesus promises.

Sunday reflection by Father Greg Friedman, from St. Anthony Messenger Press, find it on the web at Franciscan Media.

Your Sunday Resources:


What is Ordinary Time?

Ordinary Time is by no means to be considered “ordinary” in that nothing special is being remembered or celebrated!

After Pentecost, Trinity Sunday, and Corpus Christi Sunday, the Church resumes what is now called the season of “Ordinary Time.” But what does that really mean? Is it some sort of generic season in the Church that has no focus?

On the contrary – Ordinary Time has a specific focus even though the English name for it can be confusing. In Latin this period of time is called “Tempus Per Annum,” more literally translated as “time during the year.” The English translators present it as “Ordinary Time,” which has at its root the Latin word, “ordo,” or in English, “order.” In one sense this season takes its name from the ordinal numbers by which the Sundays are known (Second, Third, Fourth, etc. Sunday in Ordinary Time).

In a deeper sense, though, Ordinary Time can be seen as a “time of order” in the Church’s year. What “order” does it have?

The USCCB explains:

Christmas Time and Easter Time highlight the central mysteries of the Paschal Mystery, namely, the incarnation, death on the cross, resurrection, and ascension of Jesus Christ, and the descent of the Holy Spirit at Pentecost. The Sundays and weeks of Ordinary Time, on the other hand, take us through the life of Christ. This is the time of conversion. This is living the life of Christ.

Ordinary Time is a time for growth and maturation, a time in which the mystery of Christ is called to penetrate ever more deeply into history until all things are finally caught up in Christ. The goal, toward which all of history is directed, is represented by the final Sunday in Ordinary Time, the Solemnity of Our Lord Jesus Christ, King of the Universe.

Ordinary Time is a specific season in the Church that focuses on the life of Christ during his three years of public ministry. That is why the start of Ordinary Time begins with the Baptism of the Lord, (January) as that is the beginning of Jesus’ public ministry. The Second Sunday of Ordinary Time follows suit, focusing on the Wedding Feast at Cana, also known as Jesus’ first public miracle.

The color for this liturgical season is green, which is most associated with growth. Ordinary Time is then viewed as a time of growing in our knowledge and love of Jesus. It is a time “ordered” to spiritual growth, walking in the footsteps of Jesus’s public life.

So while the season’s name may appear to be an afterthought, it is not without meaning.


Join Us in Prayer

During the General Audience on Wednesday June 3, 2020, Pope Francis prayed for the soul of George Floyd and all those who have died from racism: “We cannot tolerate or turn a blind eye to racism…At the same time, we have to recognize that…Nothing is gained by violence and so much is lost”. Watch the video.

Our Lady of Guadalupe, Patroness of the Americas, pray for us.

Prayer of St. Francis: A Prayer for Peace
 

Lord, make me a channel of thy peace,
that where there is hatred, I may bring love;
that where there is wrong,
 I may bring the spirit of forgiveness;
that where there is discord, I may bring harmony;
that where there is error, I may bring truth;
that where there is doubt, I may bring faith;
that where there is despair, I may bring hope;
that where there are shadows, I may bring light;
that where there is sadness, I may bring joy.
Lord, grant that I may seek rather to 
comfort than to be comforted;
to understand, than to be understood;
to love, than to be loved.
For it is by self-forgetting that one finds.
It is by forgiving that one is forgiven.
It is by dying that one awakens to Eternal Life.

The Magnificat: The Prayer of Mary
 

My soul proclaims the greatness of the Lord, 
my spirit rejoices in God my Savior
for he has looked with favor on his lowly servant. 
From this day all generations will call me blessed: 
the Almighty has done great things for me, 
and holy is his Name.

He has mercy on those who fear him
in every generation. 
He has shown the strength of his arm, 
he has scattered the proud in their conceit.

He has cast down the mighty from their thrones, 
and has lifted up the lowly. 
He has filled the hungry with good things, 
and the rich he has sent away empty.

He has come to the help of his servant Israel
for he remembered his promise of mercy, 
the promise he made to our fathers, 
to Abraham and his children forever.


New weekday Mass schedule beginning Monday, June 29:

Monday through Friday: 9:00 am, 12:10 pm.
Tuesday and Thursday: 7:00 pm.

Social distancing is to be observed (6 ft separation for non-family members). Every other pew will be roped off.

Confessions:
Saturdays at 10:00 am and 4:00 pm.

Adoration Chapel:
Open 24/7. Please observe social distancing.

Regular Office Hours:
Monday through Friday: 8:30 am – 5:00 pm.


Daily Spirituality

In an effort to continue the practice of our beautiful Catholic faith at home during this time, we invite you to:

Pope Francis' Prayer to Mary during the Current Health Crisis

Join us in prayer:

O Mary,
you always shine on our path
as a sign of salvation and of hope.
We entrust ourselves to you,
Health of the Sick,
who at the cross took part in Jesus’ pain,
keeping your faith firm.

You, Salvation of the Roman People,
know what we need,
and we are sure you will provide
so that, as in Cana of Galilee,
we may return to joy and to feasting
after this time of trial.

Help us, Mother of Divine Love,
to conform to the will of the Father
and to do as we are told by Jesus,
who has taken upon himself our sufferings
and carried our sorrows
to lead us, through the cross,
to the joy of the resurrection.

Under your protection, we seek refuge,
Holy Mother of God.
Do not disdain the entreaties
of we who are in trial,
but deliver us from every danger,
O glorious and blessed Virgin. Amen.


Previous Weeks’ Readings and Resources

We will keep up to 10 weeks of past resources accessible in this page. If the set of readings and resources you would like to revisit is not on the list below, please contact our web administrator to request it by email.

June 29: Solemnity of Saints Peter and Paul Apostles

We would probably go to confession to Peter sooner than to any of the other apostles. He is perhaps a more striking example of the simple fact of holiness. Jesus says to us as he said, in effect, to Peter: “It is not you who have chosen me, but I who have chosen you. Peter, it is not human wisdom that makes it possible for you to believe, but my Father’s revelation. I, not you, build my Church.” Paul’s experience of the risen Jesus on the road to Damascus was the driving force that made him one of the most zealous, dynamic, and courageous ambassadors of Christ the Church has ever had. But persecution, humiliation, and weakness became his day-by-day carrying of the cross, material for further transformation. The dying Christ was in him; the living Christ was his life.

Read complete reflection on Franciscan Media.

Other Resources:

Sunday, June 28: Thirteenth Sunday of Ordinary Time

This Sunday’s readings invite us to reflect on another dimension of that life, hospitality. When the woman from Shunem extends to the prophet Elisha the generous hospitality of having a special guest room especially for him, she is rewarded with an unexpected gift of life: her sterility is healed and she conceives and bears a son. And even when that son dies an early death, she receives the surprising gift of his resuscitation.

Jesus’ mission discourse concludes with words elaborating that theme of hospitality and its rewards. Jesus assures his disciples that mission in his name will involve them in an adventure of hospitality that will bless abundantly those that receive them. As in the case of the Shunammite woman and Elisha, Jesus promises, “whoever receives a prophet because he is a prophet, receives a prophet’s reward.” An even larger context is revealed in the words “whoever receives you receives me, and whoever receives me receives the one who sent me” (Gospel).

In other words, Christian mission and hospitality are nothing less than living out a relationship with God. Life becomes larger than it seems. The Gospel vision denies none of the goodness of beer, cotton, and good medicine in this short biological life, but it asserts a broad network of relationships that exceeds the limitations of biological life and requires us to stretch the normal meanings of our human language about life and death.

Taken from the Sunday reflection by Fr. Dennis Hamm, SJ. Read complete reflection in this Sunday’s Liturgy of the Word.

Your Sunday Resources:

June 24: Solemnity of the Nativity of St. John the Baptist

John challenges us Christians to the fundamental attitude of Christianity—total dependence on the Father, in Christ. Except for the Mother of God, no one had a higher function in the unfolding of salvation. Yet the least in the kingdom, Jesus said, is greater than he, for the pure gift that the Father gives. The attractiveness as well as the austerity of John, his fierce courage in denouncing evil—all stem from his fundamental and total placing of his life within the will of God.

Read complete reflection on Franciscan Media.

Other Resources:

June 21: Twelfth Sunday of Ordinary Time

Like Jeremiah, Jesus in today’s Gospel is telling it like it has to be told. In the very presence of the religious elders who are in an unholy alliance with the dominating Roman imperial powers, Jesus is telling his disciples not to be afraid of any power, Roman or religious, who can harm the body. As for those who can harm the soul, be very afraid of that power.

The important thing here is what powers are bothering our souls, hurting them, killing their spirits. What imperial powers are dominating our hearts, our ways of choosing and acting? Shouldn’t how we live actually insult the pretending-powers of our times?

What is more difficult is buying into the simplicity and stability of Jesus and letting how we choose and how we speak and how we define ourselves be our strongest religious argument.

Taken from the Gospel reflection by Fr. Larry Gillick, SJ. 

Your Sunday Resources:

Friday, June 19: Solemnity of the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus

Devotion to the heart pierced on Calvary is nearly as old as Christianity, but it has undergone many changes over the centuries.

Patristic writers saw in the blood and water issuing from the crucified Lord’s side (John 19:34) the fulfillment of his promise to give living water (John 4:13–14; 7:37), the fountain from which the Spirit flows upon the Church. Medieval piety placed less emphasis on Jesus’s heart as the source of grace and moved toward more personal and sentimental devotion. Read more.

Our modern-day devotion to the Sacred Heart comes from a series of very special encounters that Jesus had with a humble Visitation nun turned saint named Margaret Mary Alacoque.

Jesus called her “the Beloved Disciple of My Heart,” and she called him her “Sovereign Master.” She was the chosen instrument that the Lord used to reveal his heart to us. In a letter, she explained, “If only you knew how much I feel drawn to love the Sacred Heart of Our Lord Jesus Christ! It seems to me life has been given me only for that.” Read more.

Saturday, June 20: The Immaculate Heart of Mary

In the 17th century, Saint John Eudes promoted devotion to the hearts of Jesus and Mary. He even composed an Office and Mass in honor of the Heart of Mary. It became a feast of the universal Church only in the 20th century and is celebrated on the day after the feast of the Sacred Heart of Jesus.

The New Testament mentions Mary’s heart only twice. Luke 2:19 says, “Mary kept all these things, reflecting on them in her heart.” Luke 2:51 has a similar text. Read more.

June 14: Solemnity of the Most Holy Body and Blood of Christ - Corpus Christi

This day we contemplate the true presence of our Lord Jesus in the Eucharist. Watch this video presentation which gives a thorough overview of the miraculous origins of the Solemnity of Corpus Christi.

Your Sunday Resources:

June 7: Solemnity of the Most Holy Trinity

Now the catholic faith is that we worship One God in Trinity and Trinity in Unity, neither confounding the Persons nor dividing the substance. For there is one Person of the Father, another of the Son, another of the Holy Spirit. But the Godhead of the Father, of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit, is One, the Glory equal, the Majesty coeternal.

Such as the Father is, such is the Son, and such is the Holy Spirit; the Father uncreated, the Son uncreated, and the Holy Spirit uncreated; the Father infinite, the Son infinite, and the Holy Spirit infinite; the Father eternal, the Son eternal, and the Holy Spirit eternal. And yet not three eternals but one eternal, as also not three infinites, nor three uncreated, but one uncreated, and one infinite. So, likewise, the Father is almighty, the Son almighty, and the Holy Spirit almighty; and yet not three almighties but one almighty.

Taken from the “Athanasian” Creed

Your Sunday Resources:

May 31, 2020: Pentecost Sunday

The RCIA Elect and Candidates who have persevered in their journey toward full communion with the Catholic Church will celebrate the sacraments of Initiation on Saturday, May 30, at the 5:30 pm Mass for the Vigil of Pentecost . The children and youth in the RCIC will be fully initiated at the 12:30 pm on Pentecost Sunday. Please remember to pray in thanksgiving for these soon–to–be new Catholics! 

We give thanks to God for them and their families and their steadfast faithfulness in their response to the prompting of the Holy Spirit and look forward to the day they will join us at the table of the Lord. Also pray for their godparents, sponsors, and RCIA/RCIC team members, who journey with them.

Come, Holy Spirit, fill the hearts of your faithful and kindle in them the fire of your love.

Your Sunday Resources:

May 24, 2020: Solemnity of the Ascension of the Lord

In most Dioceses Ascension Thursday is transferred to the Sunday before Pentecost so, today is Ascension Sunday on which we celebrate the Solemnity of the Ascension of the Lord!

We can prepare to celebrate the Eucharist firstly by praying that we delight in being believers. We pray to live as women and men who trust the spiritual gifts we received first in Baptism and were strengthened through Confirmation. We pray in the freedom of knowing who we are: gifts from God at this time and in this place.

We can pray as well with the quiet faith and presence of Mary, the Mother of Jesus, whom we have been honoring throughout this month of May; Mary, whose actions spoke louder than her words. We believe she is present in our “upper room” when we gather as Church. Her words are not recorded at Jesus’ death nor his Resurrection but her actions tell us she remained faithful as she watched what she could not change. We too can pray for that same trusting of the mysteries. Read more.

Your Sunday Resources:

May 17, 2020: Sixth Sunday of Easter
 

Jesus said to his disciples: “If you love me, you will keep my commandments. And I will ask the Father, and he will give you another Advocate to be with you always, the Spirit of truth, whom the world cannot accept, because it neither sees nor knows him. But you know him, because he remains with you, and will be in you.” ~John 14:15-17

Your Sunday Resources:

May 10, 2020: Fifth Sunday of Easter
 

Jesus said to his disciples: “Do not let your hearts be troubled. You have faith in God; have faith also in me. In my Father’s house there are many dwelling places. If there were not, would I have told you that I am going to prepare a place for you? And if I go and prepare a place for you, I will come back again and take you to myself, so that where I am you also may be. Where I am going you know the way.” ~John 14:1-4

Your Sunday Resources:

May 3, 2020: Fourth Sunday of Easter

“He himself bore our sins in his body upon the cross, so that, free from sin, we might live for righteousness. By his wounds you have been healed. For you had gone astray like sheep, but you have now returned to the shepherd and guardian of your souls.” ~I Peter 2:24-25

Your Sunday Resources:

April 26, 2020: Third Sunday of Easter

“And it happened that, while he was with them at table, he took bread, said the blessing, broke it, and gave it to them. With that their eyes were opened and they recognized him, but he vanished from their sight. Then they said to each other, “Were not our hearts burning [within us] while he spoke to us on the way and opened the scriptures to us?” ~Luke 24:30-32

Your Sunday Resources:

April 19, 2020: Second Sunday of Easter | Divine Mercy Sunday

Divine Mercy Sunday is a very special Sunday when the Divine Floodgates from Heaven are wide-opened and Jesus offers us the total forgiveness of all sins and punishment to any soul, who goes to Confession and receives Him in Holy Communion on that day.

In 1933, God gave Sister Faustina a striking vision of His Mercy, Sister tells us:
“I saw a great light, with God the Father in the midst of it. Between this light and the earth I saw Jesus nailed to the Cross and in such a way that God, wanting to look upon the earth, had to look through Our Lord’s wounds and I understood that God blessed the earth for the sake of Jesus.”

Your Sunday Resources:


Notes from Music Ministry

Our Music Ministry has recorded beautiful Hymns and Musical Meditations to accompany our families at home. We are delighted to share their recordings on our podcast: 

 


Additional Resources

To help our SJV families to stay safe and healthy during these trying times, our Social Service Ministries have compiled these Important Resources for Coping with the COVID-19 Crisis.

Find more resources at US Conference of Catholic Bishops, USCCB website.

Read the full Transcript of Pope Francis “Urbi et orbi” on Friday, March 27, 2020.  The Pope meditates on the calming of the storm from the Gospel of Mark 4:35

Find more resources at US Conference of Catholic Bishops, USCCB website.

With firm purpose you maintain peace;
in peace, because of our trust in you.
Trust in the Lord forever!
For the Lord is an eternal Rock.

~Isaiah 26:3-4